Checadito

Checar is one of those words that came into Spanish via English and is here to stay. When a native speaker scolds you for using it, just grin sheepishly and wait for them to use it unconsciously a few minutes later.

Restaurant near metro Constitución de 1917, Iztapalapa, Mexico City

Restaurant near metro Constitución de 1917, Iztapalapa, Mexico City

Checar works for ‘check, review, investigate’.

  • No he podido checar(lo) bien. I haven’t had a chance to look into it.
  • Deja checo. Let me see.

A more universal equivalent for checar is revisar.

  • Revisa bien tu cambio. Check your change.

Checar also works for an employee punching in at word by swiping an ID badge.

  • Ya chequé. I’ve already punched in.

Remember that the English noun check/cheque is cuenta in a restaurant context. Un cheque is a bank check.

Checadito

Checadito is a fun adjective that means ‘under heavy or excesive supervision’. It could be used when a boyfriend/girlfriend or boss is watching you closely, just waiting for you to screw up.

  • Me tiene bien checadito. My girlfriend is watching my every move. She has me on a leash.
  • La tengo checadita. I’m keeping close tabs on her.

As you can see from these examples, checadito is used with tener and a direct object modified by checadito.